Four traditional civil rights laws are now included
in Gun Laws of America. Use our national directory,
or buy the book, for the text of the statutes.
Click here for the news release about this change.

 

18 USC § 241. Conspiracy against rights

The Gist: If two or more people conspire to injure, oppress, threaten or intimidate any person in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured under the Constitution or laws of the United States, they shall be fined, or imprisoned up to ten years, or both. The same penalty applies if two or more people go, in disguise, on the highway, or on the premises of a person, with similar intent to prevent or hinder such rights or privileges.

If death results from such acts, or if such acts include kidnapping, attempted kidnapping, aggravated sexual assault, attempted aggravated sexual assault, or an attempt to kill, they may be fined, imprisoned for any term of years up to life, or put to death.

Based on the plain language of this statute, it appears that such offenses occur with respect to the right to keep and bear arms, guaranteed by the Second Amendment. See also 18-242, 18-1001 and 42-1983.



18 USC § 242. Deprivation of rights under color of law

The Gist: Anyone who, under color of any law, statute, ordinance, custom or regulation, willfully deprives any person of any rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution or laws of the United States, shall be fined, or imprisoned for up to one year, or both.

If bodily injury results, or if the violation includes the use or attempted or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosive or fire, the prison term rises to up to ten years. If death results, or if such acts include kidnapping, attempted kidnapping, aggravated sexual assault, attempted aggravated sexual assault, or an attempt to kill, the violator may be fined, imprisoned for any term of years up to life, or put to death. This applies also to anyone subjecting a person to different penalties than a citizen would face, because of color, race or being an alien.

Based on the plain language of this statute, it appears that such offenses occur with respect to the right to keep and bear arms, guaranteed by the Second Amendment. See also 18-241, 18-1001 and 42-1983.



18 USC § 1001. Statements or entries generally


The Gist: A person who knowingly and willfully makes any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative or judicial branches of the federal government, shall be fined, or imprisoned for up to five years, or both. The offense includes falsifying, concealing or covering up by any trick, scheme or device, a material fact, or making or using any false writing or document.

The degree to which this applies to denial of the right to keep and bear arms, under false or misleading pretense by law enforcement or other officials, is unclear. Limited exceptions to this statute exist for certain judicial proceedings, legislative activity and investigations by Congress. This law has roots that trace back to March 4, 1909. See also 18-241, 18-242 and 42-1983.



42 USC § 1983. Civil action for deprivation of rights

The Gist: Every person who, under color of law or other presumption of authority, deprives a person of any right, privilege or immunity secured by the Constitution or by law, is liable to that person for damages in a lawsuit or other proper form of redress. Limited exceptions exist for judicial officers acting in their official capacity.

The roots of this law stretch back to the post-Civil War era, in the Civil Rights Act of Apr. 20, 1871. The tangential but obvious connection of this law to gun law is part of a reexamination of the guarantee of the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms as a basic civil right. See also 18-241, 18-242 and 18-1001.

 

COMPLETE ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRODUCTS
Gun LawsGun Rights Gun PoliticsFree SpeechVideosSelf Defense and Safety
SurvivalPolice GuidesKnivesNovelsThe Founders PackageHistory of Rights
ButtonsRecent Additions  123Women & KidsFirst-Time Gun Owners
E-BooksNewest ProductsCloseoutsPackage Deals
Bloomfield Press

gunlaws.com and bloomfieldpress.com are domains owned by Alan Korwin.

Alan is a nationally recognized author of numerous books
on gun laws and other topics.

If you like this site you'll like his books. Take a look